Creating a climate positive world

One Million Trees

Brazil

Forest Trends - One Million Trees Project

Brazil | $2.00 per tree

The project plans to plant 1 million trees across the next 3 years covering 500+ hectares and 9 indigenous lands in the Brazilian Amazon. It aims to provide food security and economic income for thousands of indigenous people, whilst contributing to biodiversity conservation over 1.5 million hectares of rainforest.

Forest-Trends is an American non-profit organization founded in 1998. Their mission is to work with communities, governments, and businesses to more fully embed conservation into economic activity and prevent the destruction that comes from badly planned, unsustainable resource allocation and development.

This project is run in conjunction with the Arbor Day Foundation and is part of the Forest Trends Communities and Territorial Governance Initiative (CTGI). It provides capacity building and support to Indigenous people throughout the Amazon. One of the main focuses of this arm of Forest Trends has been on food security which this planting project will really harness, as well as contribute to providing different economic alternatives and conserve biodiversity. The project will also be run in conjunction with the Xingu Seeds Network Association, the NGO Ecoporé, working closely with the Indigenous communities within the area. 

Fighting Deforestation

The project is based in the Tupi Mosaic Corridor located in the states of Mato Grosso, and Rondonia in the Brazilian Amazon. It aims to complete most of the planting within the next 3 years. The Tupi Mosaic encompasses 8 indigenous territories. 

Over the past year, deforestation increased by 30% in the Brazilian Amazon, representing an area more than six times the size of Greater London. The Tupi Mosaic has experienced some of the fastest and aggressive deforestation in the past four decades. In total, the Tupi Mosaic is home to 21 indigenous groups across 1.5 million hectares. 

Indigenous forest territories cover about 115 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon. As threats to Indigenous Peoples escalate, it is urgent to support their economic and cultural resilience. The role of Indigenous peoples and local communities have long been noted as key in combating the climate crisis.

Planting will be based on agroforestry systems that will mimic the natural forests regeneration processes. The planting sites are based on areas that are currently deforested or covered with grass.  

Positive for people

This project will benefit the Indigenous people that live within these territories. The trees planted will be a mix of native species as well as providing agroforestry trees such as Açai, Brazil Nut, Cocoa and others. Wild Cacao for example can be more resilient to climate change, and also commands premium prices at market enhancing the income for indigenous people within the area. 

Other species will support artisanal work such as Tucum and Babassu. The artisan sector is the second-largest employer in the developing world and is an important source of income.

Why this Project?

We chose to partner with Forest Trends on this project because we believe in how they are striving to support Indigenous peoples through planned sustainable development initiatives. This project also supports how important it is to listen and collaborate with indigenous populations. Scientists have long proven that indigenous territories (ITs) ensure the long term protection of land from deforestation and mineral, oil and gas extraction

Satellite Data

We will soon be providing monthly satellite data for this project.

  • Trees Planted
    1,000,000
  • Area Restored
    1000+ hectares
  • Cost per tree
    $2.00
  • Indigenous Territories Supported
    9

Project SDGs *Sustainable Development Goals

How does it work?

Undoing climate change isn't easy. But our powerful partners make it happen.

1

Build capacity on seed collection: the local communities will be trained on collecting and treating seeds from native seed species. The commercialisation of seed generates income for local communities and supports forest conservation activities.

2

Installation of nurseries. These will be small-scale with the beneficiary families receiving assistance for selecting the sites, and the management of these nurseries. The selected site is prepared by cutting the exotic grasses and incorporating the soil on the planting area.

3

Forest management. Local communities will lead this work with their knowledge of agroforestry practices and mixed seeds planting techniques. Any seedlings that don't survive will be replanted, pruning will take place and the competition will be controlled to ensure growth.

Why this project?

We chose to partner with Forest Trends on this project because we believe in how they are striving to support Indigenous peoples through planned sustainable development initiatives. This project also supports how important it is to listen and collaborate with indigenous populations. Scientists have long proven that indigenous territories (ITs) ensure the long-term protection of land from deforestation and mineral, oil and gas extraction